These Are the Biggest Snakes in the United States

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake:

Reaching 7 feet, this venomous snake inhabits deserts and forests across the southwestern U.S. and can inject a potent venom with its bite.

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Eastern Rat Snake:

Also known as the black rat snake, this non-venomous snake can grow up to 7.5 feet and is found in various habitats, including urban areas.

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Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake:

Often considered the most dangerous snake in the U.S., it reaches 8 feet and has highly potent venom and long fangs, living in the southeastern U.S.

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Bullsnake:

This non-venomous constrictor can grow to 8 feet and inhabits grasslands, forests, and farmlands, mimicking rattlesnakes as a defense mechanism.

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Coachwhip:

Known for its unusual appearance and length of up to 8.5 feet, this diurnal snake inhabits fields and open forests in the southern U.S.

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Eastern Indigo Snake:

The largest native snake in the U.S., reaching 9 feet, it is an apex predator found in hardwood forests and swamps in the southeastern U.S.

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Asiatic Rock Python:

An invasive species reaching 10 feet, it was introduced through the exotic pet trade and now inhabits several U.S. states, posing a threat to native wildlife.

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Boa Constrictor:

Reaching 15 feet, this non-venomous snake was introduced through the pet trade and now has an established population in southern Florida.

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Burmese Python:

One of the most invasive species in the Florida Everglades, this large constrictor can grow up to 16 feet and preys on endangered native animals.

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Southern African Rock Python:

This invasive species, reaching up to 16 feet, has established a population in Texas, posing a threat to local wildlife.

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